Powercore features in Sunday Times

"VA-VA-vroom — almost literally. There are a number of companies on a mission to turn every home into a mini power station that charges its own battery." - Martina Lees, Sunday Times

Powercore

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Introduction

Powercore is a smart storage system and is designed to maximise self-consumption, enabling greater independence from energy companies and control of rising energy bills. Powercore is available in different capacities and is flexible to suit your energy needs. The Powercore uses best in class Lithium Ion Batteries which have been tested extensively over many years. Powercore is specifically designed to be flexible & can be easily upgraded if your power consumption needs change

Powercore

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Revolutionary Design

Designed by an award-winning UK designer, the “Powercore” brings an elegance to the household which is superior to other domestic energy storage systems. Internally, our engineers have worked hard to produce a system that is at the forefront of battery technology.

Powercore

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Energy security for your home

Powercore provides UPS (un-interruptable power supply) capability. This means during a power cut, the Powercore will automatically continue to maintain selected critical circuits. This will generally include lighting, fridge/freezer, Internet & phones, but can be configured to your specific needs

During the day

Free solar energy charges your Powercore with the excess energy normally exported to the grid

During the night

Powercore sends stored energy back into your house, which means you are not taking energy from the grid, therefore reducing your energy bill

Your feed in tariff

Powercore is AC coupled, which means that it is connected to your distribution board just like your oven or shower. Therefore it does not interfere with your feed in tariff payments

Powercore

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Interface with your storage system & learn to optimise your self-consumption

The Powercore unit includes a powerful local display unit. The LCD display enables user-friendly interaction to understand how the system is functioning. It also enables remote monitoring and control. Powercore’s portal is free of charge and the performance of your renewable energy systems, including Solar PV, can be monitored on a mobile device. Remote configuring and optimisation updates are also possible, ensuring peak performance with minimal disruption. Powercore delivers more than just a unique energy storage system – it provides a service that enables you to learn and optimise your solar consumption, maximising the benefit from your investment

Powercore Technical Data

1. Powercore D1
Storage
Installed Capacity (KWh): 2.4
Useable Capacity 80% DOD (kWh): 1.92
Warrantied Battery Cycles: 6000
Battery Type: Lithium Ion
Nominal Voltage: 50
Operating Voltage: 45 to 54
Battery Management System: CANBus / R5232 / R5485
Inverter
Power (W) Output Cont @ 25C: 2500
Output Voltage Output Voltage: 230 VAC ± 2% Frequency: 50Hz ± 0.1%
Max Efficiency: 95%
Zero Load Power - Max (W) 16 Standards: Safety EN 60335-1, EN 60335-2-29 Emission / Immunity EN55014-1
EN 55014-2, EN 61000-3-3, Automotive Directive 2004/104/EC
Charger
Max Charge Current (Amps): 25 Amps
AC Input Voltage Range: 187-265 VAC Input Frequency: 45-65 Hz
Overall Weight (Chassis 52Kg): 75Kg
Overall System Operating Temp: 0 to 45°C
Humidity (non condensing): Max 95%
Brochure
2. Powercore D2
Storage
Installed Capacity (KWh): 4.8
Useable Capacity 80% DOD (kWh): 3.84
Warrantied Battery Cycles: 6000
Battery Type: Lithium Ion
Nominal Voltage: 50
Operating Voltage: 45 to 54
Battery Management System: CANBus / R5232 / R5485
Inverter
Power (W) Output Cont @ 25C: 2500
Output Voltage Output Voltage: 230 VAC ± 2% Frequency: 50Hz ± 0.1%
Max Efficiency: 95%
Zero Load Power - Max (W) 16 Standards: Safety EN 60335-1, EN 60335-2-29 Emission / Immunity EN55014-1
EN 55014-2, EN 61000-3-3, Automotive Directive 2004/104/EC
Charger
Max Charge Current (Amps): 35 Amps
AC Input Voltage Range: 187-265 VAC Input Frequency: 45-65 Hz
Overall Weight (Chassis 52Kg): 98Kg
Overall System Operating Temp: 0 to 45°C
Humidity (non condensing): Max 95%
Brochure
3. Powercore D3
Storage
Installed Capacity (KWh): 7.2
Useable Capacity 80% DOD (kWh): 5.76
Warrantied Battery Cycles: 6000
Battery Type: Lithium Ion
Nominal Voltage: 50
Operating Voltage: 45 to 54
Battery Management System: CANBus / R5232 / R5485
Inverter
Power (W) Output Cont @ 25C: 2500
Output Voltage Output Voltage: 230 VAC ± 2% Frequency: 50Hz ± 0.1%
Max Efficiency: 95%
Zero Load Power - Max (W) 16 Standards: Safety EN 60335-1, EN 60335-2-29 Emission / Immunity EN55014-1
EN 55014-2, EN 61000-3-3, Automotive Directive 2004/104/EC
Charger
Max Charge Current (Amps): 35 Amps
AC Input Voltage Range: 187-265 VAC Input Frequency: 45-65 Hz
Overall Weight (Chassis 52Kg): 121Kg
Overall System Operating Temp: 0 to 45°C
Humidity (non condensing): Max 95%
Brochure

Frequently asked questions.

If you cant find the answer below, please use the contact form to get in touch
Why energy storage is important?

Energy storage fundamentally improves the way we generate, deliver, and consume electricity. Energy storage helps during emergencies like power outages and equipment failure. But the game-changing nature of energy storage is its ability to balance power supply and demand instantaneously, making power networks more resilient, efficient, and cleaner than ever before.

Why do we need to store energy?

Patterns of energy supply and consumption are changing rapidly due to several factors, including increasing penetration of renewable energy sources and distributed generation, a sustained increase in fossil fuel prices, changing market regulations and stringent environmental targets.

There is considerable pressure on stakeholders to evolve to meet these new demands. Effective energy storage can deliver a number of strategic services both on the regulated and deregulated side of the power business, addressing three major challenges:

• Balancing demand & supply
• Managing transmission & distribution grids
• Increasing need for energy efficiency.

How big is the energy storage market?

World-wide demand for grid-scale energy storage is estimated to reach over 185.4GWh by 2017. Energy storage is crucial to renewable energy providing a larger share of the energy mix. A handful of countries are responsible for the growth in energy storage at present. In Europe, Germany has established demand for behind-the-meter energy storage in the residential solar PV market to enable self-consumption. Several power producers and utilities in Germany are also building large-scale energy storage plants to provide ancillary grid services, without requiring subsidy to build these assets.

In the UK energy storage systems built on the distribution network demonstrate how battery storage can achieve payback by carrying out several functions, such as deferral of grid works, and provision of the grid’s ancillary services.

Residential and commercial solar customers are also interested in energy storage for backup, for when there are grid outages. In several states, including California, proactive policies and targets for energy storage have helped unlock demand for the technology for deployment by utilities.

How cost-effective is energy storage?

Intermittent forms of renewable energy such as wind and solar tend to be most productive at times other than when demand is highest. At its simplest level, energy storage holds onto the excess energy produced by renewables for when there is peak demand.

The alternative is to build more transmission and distribution cables and infrastructure to ensure that the grid can cope with excess electricity produced by renewables.

Depending on demand and supply in a given region storage can therefore be a less costly alternative compared to the construction of additional T&D infrastructure.

Energy storage can, in some cases, compete with back-up fossil fuelled power generation for grid stability. This may diminish the impact of load-following on power plant efficiency.

As costs of energy storage technology, such as batteries, continue to come down it will become more affordable in the coming years.

What is the impact of energy storage on the environment?

Reducing CO2 emissions while ensuring security of energy supply is at the forefront of the EU integrated approach to fighting climate change.

In 2007, Member States set the so-called “20-20-20” targets by 2020:

• a 20% reduction in EU greenhouse gas emissions (GHG)
• a 20% increase of the share of RES in EU’s energy
consumption • a 20% increase of energy efficiency

In 2011, the European Commission published its Energy Roadmap 2050 exploring pathways toward a low carbon economy with a CO2 emission reduction of 85-90% compared to 1990 levels.

Switching to renewable energy sources will inevitably lead to a situation in which, from time to time, generation will largely exceed demand or vice versa, with specific concerns regarding transmission and distribution networks.

The growing penetration of renewable energy, in particular non-dispatchable generation such as wind and solar PV, will increase the need for flexibility in the energy system.

Energy storage is especially well suited to respond to this challenge and ensure a continued security of energy supply at any time.

The share of intermittent wind and solar energy in our electricity supplies will expand significantly. Renewable energy supply will then exceed demand at times and the electricity network will operate at the limits of its capacity combined with intelligent energy storage. Renewable power, enabled by energy storage, will be able to cover more and more base-load demand.

Energy storage can enable the energy system to operate more efficiently, by reducing system losses, and it can substitute grid services that are at present provided by fossil fuel generators.

Concerns related to the recycling of energy storage components (end of life recycling) will be taken into consideration along the work developed by EASE.

How does energy storage work?

Energy storage devices are “charged” when they absorb energy, either directly from renewable generation devices or indirectly from the electricity grid. They “discharge” when they deliver the stored energy back into the grid.

Charge and discharge normally require power conversion devices, to transform electrical energy (AC or DC) into a different form of electrical, thermal, mechanical or chemical form of energy.

Energy storage can be used among to store surplus energy from intermittent renewable sources, such as solar PV and wind power, until it is required.

There exist many different forms of energy storage: chemical (batteries, natural gas, hydrogen, electrolysis), mechanical (pumped storage plants, compressed air energy storage, pumped heat electrical storage, compressed storage of liquid air) and thermal (molten salt, bulk goods).

Dependent on the needs of the specific application or use case, various solutions are possible depending on whether a larger number of small, local storage facilities or a smaller number of large, central facilities are to be used.

The two main parameters to differentiate energy storage solutions are:

• Power: can reach from a few kW (e.g. in end user applications like residential PV) to MW (large scale generation plants) up to hundreds of MW or even GW for centralised bulk energy storage devices.

• Time: storage may perform charge or discharge functions over a few seconds or minutes (e.g. for grid services like frequency stabilisation), minutes to a few hours (smoothing or time shift of renewable generation), up to days and weeks (balancing long term fluctuations in generation and consumption). Multiplying power by time delivers the capacity or energy content of the storage.

1. drop a line

info@powercorenergy.co.uk
support@powercorenergy.co.uk

2. call us

+44 (0)118 9739706

3. Head Office

11 Ivanhoe Road
Finchampstead, Berkshire
RG40 4QQ
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